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Rafael Nadal, Roland-Garros champion: what now?

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Crowned at the last edition of Roland-Garros, Rafael Nadal will now have to get down to treating his foot. The future of the Spanish star on the tennis courts now depends on his ability to cope with Müller-Weiss syndrome, which is causing him severe pain in his foot. Europe 1 takes stock.

We no longer count the victories of Rafael Nadal. The Spanish player won the Roland-Garros tournament this Sunday against Casper Ruud. During the clay-court tournament, the crowd chanted his first name relentlessly, until he lifted the Mousquetaires Cup – for the 14th time. However, his left foot affected by a degenerative bone disease makes him suffer so much, to the point of being given injections to anesthetize him. “Roland-Garros is Roland-Garros and everyone knows how important this tournament is to me,” explains the Mallorcan, who has Müller-Weiss syndrome.

A future conditioned by painkillers

Putting his foot to sleep before each encounter was therefore the only possibility. But Rafael Nadal knows it, this solution is too radical to be sustainable. At the same time, his thirst for victory and his passion for tennis remain intact. “I have the feeling that he is faced with a dilemma, namely ‘am I pushing my body?'”, estimates Cédric Pioline, consultant for Europe 1. “And on the other hand, he wins a 14th title at Roland-Garros, a 22nd Grand Slam title against 20 for his direct competitor Novak Djokovic.”

Last night, after his new success at Porte d’Auteuil, there was no question of a possible retirement. Rafael Nadal even hopes to go play in London for the Wimbledon tournament, provided he finds a solution other than anesthetic injections. He must soon try a new painkiller.

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